What's happening?

We’re creating several exciting new routes across the city centre to connect existing cycle lanes, and to make cycling to and through the city an easier, safer and more enjoyable experience.

The roadworks taking place at the junction of Castle Boulevard and Wilford Street will link the new two-way segregated cycle lane on Canal Street with the Western Cycle Corridor.

City Centre Cycle Routes

 

How will I be affected?

During the first phase of the programme, expected to last four to five weeks (18 October – 14 November) the following will be in place:

Canal Street

  • Two lanes reduced to one heading westbound toward Castle Boulevard and southbound to Wilford Street. This will become the permanent layout when works are completed

Greyfriar Gate

  • One lane closure travelling west to Castle Boulevard or south to Wilford Street

The pedestrian crossing outside Castle Wharf House will be shut while work takes place in this area.

Once these works are complete, further works will be carried out in Wilford Street. Dates and any restrictions will be posted here when confirmed.

 

Why are we doing this?

We’re creating several exciting new routes across the city centre to connect existing cycle lanes, and to make cycling to and through the city an easier, safer and more enjoyable experience.

The Covid-19 pandemic has led to people becoming more active, and these routes at the heart of the significant Southside redevelopment will ensure Broad Marsh and the Island Quarter are well connected to the rest of the city.

The new lanes will be segregated away from traffic and pedestrian areas as much as possible.

Cycling has great benefits for physical and mental health, and by replacing shorter car journeys we can all help to reduce harmful emissions and help the city achieve our aim to be carbon neutral by 2028.

The new lanes will open as they’re completed, with all sections finished by March 2023.

This project is part of Nottingham and Derby’s Transforming Cities programme. Working in partnership, Nottingham City and Derby City Councils secured £161 million from the Department for Transport to invest in local transport infrastructure that will improve sustainable transport, support growth, and encourage more low carbon journeys.